SEND CASES OF WOMEN & GIRLS MURDERED BY MEN & BOYS TO: shecounted@gmail.com

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Femicide: The Politics of Woman Killing edited by Jill Radford & Diana E. H. Russell

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"'There's no place like home.' This familiar phrase invokes the image of an ideal: home as safe haven and shelter from the world. For women who have been victims of femicide - misogynist killing by men - these simple words take on a disturbing new meaning. There is indeed no place like home for a woman who has died at the hands of a man, because it is there that she was least safe from harm. The threat of violent death for a woman is in fact greatest in her own home. And her killer is likely no stranger, no masked psychopath, but someone who knew her intimately, a companion or former companion, a husband or lover. In Femicide: The Politics of Woman Killing editors Jill Radford and Diana E.H. Russell have compiled more than 40 articles and essays that document and describe such terrible truths about the phenomenon of femicide."

Making a Killing: Femicide, Free Trade, & La Frontera by Alicia Gaspar de Alba & Georgina Guzmán

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"Bringing together diverse perspectives, including feminism, Marxism, critical race theory, semiotics, and textual analysis, this is the first anthology to focus exclusively on the murders of more than five hundred women and girls in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico."

Whose Story is This?: Old Conflicts, New Chapters by Rebecca Solnit

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"Who gets to shape the narrative of our times? The current moment is a battle royale over that foundational power, one in which women, people of color, non-straight people are telling other versions, and white people and men and particularly white men are trying to hang onto the old versions and their own centrality. In Whose Story Is This? Rebecca Solnit appraises what's emerging and why it matters and what the obstacles are."

Men Explain Things to Me by Rebecca Solnit

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"In her comic, scathing essay “Men Explain Things to Me,” Rebecca Solnit took on what often goes wrong in conversations between men and women. She wrote about men who wrongly assume they know things and wrongly assume women don’t, about why this arises, and how this aspect of the gender wars works, airing some of her own hilariously awful encounters.

She ends on a serious note— because the ultimate problem is the silencing of women who have something to say, including those saying things like, “He’s trying to kill me!”

This book features that now-classic essay with six perfect complements, including an examination of the great feminist writer Virginia Woolf ’s embrace of mystery, of not knowing, of doubt and ambiguity, a highly original inquiry into marriage equality, and a terrifying survey of the scope of contemporary violence against women."

Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women's Anger by Soraya Chemaly

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"As women, we’ve been urged for so long to bottle up our anger, letting it corrode our bodies and minds in ways we don’t even realize. Yet there are so, so many legitimate reasons for us to feel angry, ranging from blatant, horrifying acts of misogyny to the subtle drip, drip drip of daily sexism that reinforces the absurdly damaging gender norms of our society. In Rage Becomes Her, Soraya Chemaly argues that our anger is not only justified, it is also an active part of the solution. We are so often encouraged to resist our rage or punished for justifiably expressing it, yet how many remarkable achievements would never have gotten off the ground without the kernel of anger that fueled them? Approached with conscious intention, anger is a vital instrument, a radar for injustice and a catalyst for change. On the flip side, the societal and cultural belittlement of our anger is a cunning way of limiting and controlling our power—one we can no longer abide."

Terrorizing Women: Feminicide in the Americas by Rosa-Linda Fregoso & Cynthia Bejarano

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"Terrorizing Women is an impassioned yet rigorously analytical response to the escalation in violence against women in Latin America during the past two decades. It is part of a feminist effort to categorize violence rooted in gendered power structures as a violation of human rights. The analytical framework of feminicide is crucial to that effort, as the editors explain in their introduction. They define feminicide as gender-based violence that implicates both the state (directly or indirectly) and individual perpetrators. It is structural violence rooted in social, political, economic, and cultural inequalities."

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Arrested Justice: Black Women, Violence, and America’s Prison Nation by Beth E. Richie

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"Black women in marginalized communities are uniquely at risk of battering, rape, sexual harassment, stalking and incest. Through the compelling stories of Black women who have been most affected by racism, persistent poverty, class inequality, limited access to support resources or institutions, Beth E. Richie shows that the threat of violence to Black women has never been more serious, demonstrating how conservative legal, social, political and economic policies have impacted activism in the U.S.-based movement to end violence against women. Richie argues that Black women face particular peril because of the ways that race and culture have not figured centrally enough in the analysis of the causes and consequences of gender violence. As a result, the extent of physical, sexual and other forms of violence in the lives of Black women, the various forms it takes, and the contexts within which it occurs are minimized—at best—and frequently ignored. Arrested Justice brings issues of sexuality, class, age, and criminalization into focus right alongside of questions of public policy and gender violence, resulting in a compelling critique, a passionate re-framing of stories, and a call to action for change."

No Visible Bruises: What We Don't Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us by Rachel Louise Snyder

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"We call it domestic violence. We call it private violence. Sometimes we call it intimate terrorism. But whatever we call it, we generally do not believe it has anything to do with us. In America, domestic violence accounts for 15% of all violent crime… we have not taken the true measure of this problem. In No Visible Bruises, Rachel Louise Snyder gives context for what we don’t know we’re seeing. She frame this urgent and immersive account of the scale of domestic violence around key stories that exploded the common myths — that if things were bad enough victims would just leave; that a violent person cannot become nonviolent; that shelter is an adequate response; and more insidiously, that violence inside the home is disconnected from other forms of violence. Through the stories of victims, perpetrators, law enforcement, and reform movements, Snyder explores the real roots of private violence, its far-reaching consequences for society, and what it will take to truly address it."

LGBTQ Intimate Partner Violence: Lessons for Policy, Practice, and Research by Adam M. Messinger

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"Nationally representative studies confirm that LGBTQ individuals are at an elevated risk of experiencing intimate partner violence. While many similarities exist between LGBTQ and heterosexual-cisgender intimate partner violence, research has illuminated a variety of unique aspects of LGBTQ intimate partner violence regarding the predictors of perpetration, the specific forms of abuse experienced, barriers to help-seeking for victims, and policy and intervention needs. This is the first book that systematically reviews the literature regarding LGBTQ intimate partner violence, draws key lessons for current practice and policy, and recommends research areas and enhanced methodologies."

Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence by Judith L. Herman, MD

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"Trauma and Recovery brings a new level of understanding to a set of problems usually considered individually. Herman draws on her own cutting-edge research in domestic violence as well as on the vast literature of combat veterans and victims of political terror, to show the parallels between private terrors such as rape and public traumas such as terrorism. The book puts individual experience in a broader political frame, arguing that psychological trauma can be understood only in a social context. Meticulously documented and frequently using the victims’ own words as well as those from classic literary works and prison diaries, Trauma and Recovery is a powerful work that will continue to profoundly impact our thinking."

News Coverage of Violence against Women: Engendering Blame by Marian Meyers

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"This original ... work demonstrates the troubling evidence that news coverage in American cities routinely depicts criminal violence against females differently than males. News Coverage of Violence Against Women discusses this tendency and how it perpetuates traditional, inegalitarian stereotyping about both men and women. Author Marian Meyers combines original research with qualitative textual analysis to disclose the underlying ideology, myths, and assumptions within news coverage, pointing out how news broadcasting affects our view of the world and how we live our lives. She also makes a strong case for the re-examination of crime news from a feminist perspective and for a broadening of traditional understandings of the social construction of news to include issues of gender, race, and class."

African American Women in the News: Gender, Race, and Class in Journalism by Marian Meyers

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"African American Women in the News offers the first in-depth examination of the varied representations of black women in American journalism, from analyses of coverage of domestic abuse and "crack mothers" to exploration of new media coverage of Michelle Obama on Youtube. Marian Meyers interrogates the varied, complex, and often contradictory images of African American women in various news media through detailed case studies of both national and local news, the mainstream and black press, and traditional news outlets as well as new digital news platforms. She argues that previous studies of African Americans and the news have largely ignored the representations of women as distinct from men, and the ways in which socioeconomic class becomes a determining factor in how black women are portrayed by the press. Meyers proposes that a pattern of paternalistic racism, as distinct from the "modern" racism found in previous studies of news coverage of African Americans, is more likely to characterize the media's treatment of African American women. Drawing on critical cultural studies and black feminist theory, Meyers suggests that the cultural myths and stereotypes of African American women we see in the news belies a far more complex and contradictory issue, located at the intersection of race, class and gender. African American Women in the News is ideal for courses on race and news media, and for professional journalists and students of journalism who seek to improve the diversity and sensitivity of their journalistic practice."

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Missing Bodies: The Politics of Visibility by Monica J. Casper and Lisa Jean Moore

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"We know more about the physical body—how it begins, how it responds to illness, even how it decomposes—than ever before. Yet not all bodies are created equal, some bodies clearly count more than others, and some bodies are not recognized at all. In Missing Bodies, Monica J. Casper and Lisa Jean Moore explore the surveillance, manipulations, erasures, and visibility of the body in the twenty-first century. The authors examine bodies, both actual and symbolic, in a variety of arenas: pornography, fashion, sports, medicine, photography, cinema, sex work, labor, migration, medical tourism, and war. This new politics of visibility can lead to the overexposure of some bodies—Lance Armstrong, Jessica Lynch—and to the near invisibility of others—dead Iraqi civilians, illegal immigrants, the victims of HIV/AIDS and "natural" disasters.

Missing Bodies presents a call for a new, engaged way of seeing and recovering bodies in a world that routinely, often strategically, obscures or erases them. It poses difficult, even startling questions: Why did it take so long for the United States media to begin telling stories about the "falling bodies" of 9/11? Why has the United States government refused to allow photographs or filming of flag-draped coffins carrying the bodies of soldiers who are dying in Iraq? Why are the bodies of girls and women so relentlessly sexualized? By examining the cultural politics at work in such disappearances and inclusions of the physical body the authors show how the social, medical and economic consequences of visibility can reward or undermine privilege in society."

Joyful Human Rights by William Paul Simmons

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"In popular, legal, and academic discourses, the term "human rights" is now almost always discussed in relation to its opposite: human rights abuses. Syllabi, textbooks, and articles focus largely on victimization and trauma, with scarcely a mention of a positive dimension. Joy, especially, is often discounted and disregarded. William Paul Simmons asserts that there is a time and place—and necessity—in human rights work for being joyful.

Joyful Human Rights leads us to challenge human rights' foundations afresh. Focusing on joy shifts the way we view victims, perpetrators, activists, and martyrs; and mitigates our propensity to express paternalistic or heroic attitudes toward human rights victims. Victims experience joy—indeed, it is often what sustains them and, in many cases, what best facilitates their recovery from trauma. Instead of reducing individuals merely to victim status or the tragedies they have experienced, human rights workers can help harmed individuals reclaim their full humanity, which includes positive emotions such as joy."

Not One More! Feminicidio on the Border by Nina Maria Lozano

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"Since 1993, more than 2,000 feminicidios have occurred in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico—once called “the feminicidio capital of the world.” Who is killing the women of Juárez? Why is this happening? In Not One More! Feminicidio on the Border, Nina Maria Lozano seeks to answer these questions, turning a critical eye to the state structures and legal systems that allow and participate in the violence, rape, and murder propagated against thousands of women in the border town of Juárez."

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